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Thursday 29th July 2021 10:00 AM

China's Rare-Earth Strategy Versus US Risks Backfiring


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China is really looking to develop its dominance over the rare-earth minerals essential for myriad tech products, in part through regulations designed to enhance high-end industries. By doing so this, however, Beijing risks driving investment into the rare-earth industry of its trade war foe, the U.S.


China produces approximately 80% of global rare earths, used in a number of products including smartphones and the motors of hybrid and electric vehicles. Amid concerns that Beijing is taking into account some form of export restrictions, prices of rare earths have jumped over the last few months.


The price of neodymium, normally used in magnets, has surged 30% to $68.5 per kilogram since April, while dysprosium, also used in magnets, has risen 30% to $290 per kilogram in the same period.


Both materials are essential. Neodymium heightens magnetic force but its performance is reduced under high temperature. Since motors can run very hot, dysprosium is incorporated to help the neodymium resist heat. As more electric and hybrid vehicles hit the market, demand for the minerals is expected to soar.


Given the importance of such minerals to industry and defense, Washington left out rare-earth materials when it raised tariffs to 25% on basically all Chinese imports in recent times. Analysts said Beijing is less likely to resort to the aggressive measures it has used in the past, lest it incur the U.S. wrath. "China's attitudes and remarks are milder [this time] compared with when Beijing controlled shipments of rare earths to Japan in 2010," said Kotaro Shimizu, chief analyst at Mitsubishi UFJ Research and Consulting.


That year, the U.S. attempted to revive the mining of rare earths locally by introducing a bill, the Rare Earths Supply-Chain Technology and Resources Transformation, known as the RESTART Act. Even though the law failed to gain traction, Shimizu said, "Now we see again the rise of voices calling for rare-earth production in the U.S."


When Beijing controlled the exports to Japan, tensions between the countries had become more intense over the Senkaku Islands, which China claims and calls Diaoyu. During that time, Chinese public opinion was "all about how China can hurt Japan by leveraging rare earths," Shimizu said.


But the clampdown came with a price tag for China. Facing a sudden supply shortage and price spike, Japanese companies started to reduce rare-earth consumption and alternatively focused on recycling. According to the Japan Society of Newer Metals, the country's rare-earth demand fell to 13,197 tons in 2012 from 32,390 in 2007. "Beijing still remembers that they put their own industry in a really difficult situation by restricting rare-earth exports in 2010," said Yoshikazu Watanabe, president of Tsukushi Shigen Consul, a natural resources consulting company. "China's moves now are for show and to remind the U.S. that it could restrict exports."


Just after the failure of the RESTART Act, prices in the U.S. market slumped for years and mining company Molycorp filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2015. American rare-earth production finished solely from 2016 until last year, when the U.S. produced 15,000 metric tons, as stated in data from the U.S. Geological Survey.


The U.S. still is lacking capacities to separate rare earths. Ores obtained from Mountain Pass, the only U.S. mine under operation, are shipped to China, that has the most advanced separation technology. Beijing already imposed a 25% tariff on rare-earth ores from the U.S. that are sent to China for separation on June 1.


But initiatives are underway to fill the gap in the stateside supply chain. Australia's Lynas, the largest rare-earth producer outside China, announced in May that it had signed an agreement with U.S. rare-earth processor Blue Line for a partnership to develop separation facilities in the U.S. Shigeo Nakamura, president of Advanced Material Japan, said the U.S. has alternatives for separation in Vietnam, Myanmar and Estonia. "There will always be export pathways [available] to the U.S. through a third country," he said. So Beijing is treading cautiously as it works to strengthen its position.


China's economic planner, the National Development and Reform Commission, said just lately that rare-earth producers should abandon low-end production methods by increasing investment and research to enhance the competitiveness of their minerals.


Meanwhile, Beijing in May began restricting imports of rare earths from Myanmar to stop smuggling. Myanmar produces dysprosium and terbium - known as medium-heavy rare earths that can be found in very few places on the planet. Large volumes of ores flow illegally into China; reportedly, as much as 85% of China's rare-earth imports come from Myanmar.


When dealing with actual components like rare-earth magnets, which are shipped to the U.S. mainly from Japan, the effects of the tensions appear to be negligible so far. Shin-Etsu Chemical, which produces the magnets, said the trade war "hasn't had an impact on the production and shipments of rare-earth magnets." The Japanese company imports rare-earth alloys from its Chinese subsidiary in Fujian in southeastern China and makes the magnets in Japan.


Nakamura at Advanced Material Japan suggested China risks a boomerang effect. "The more Beijing tries to weaponize rare earths, the more development and investments the U.S. industry will attract," he said. "China will be the only one to lose out."





Source: NIKKEI ASIAN REVIEW


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Posted on : Thursday 29th July 2021 10:00 AM

China's Rare-Earth Strategy Versus US Risks Backfiring


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
image cap

China is really looking to develop its dominance over the rare-earth minerals essential for myriad tech products, in part through regulations designed to enhance high-end industries. By doing so this, however, Beijing risks driving investment into the rare-earth industry of its trade war foe, the U.S.


China produces approximately 80% of global rare earths, used in a number of products including smartphones and the motors of hybrid and electric vehicles. Amid concerns that Beijing is taking into account some form of export restrictions, prices of rare earths have jumped over the last few months.


The price of neodymium, normally used in magnets, has surged 30% to $68.5 per kilogram since April, while dysprosium, also used in magnets, has risen 30% to $290 per kilogram in the same period.


Both materials are essential. Neodymium heightens magnetic force but its performance is reduced under high temperature. Since motors can run very hot, dysprosium is incorporated to help the neodymium resist heat. As more electric and hybrid vehicles hit the market, demand for the minerals is expected to soar.


Given the importance of such minerals to industry and defense, Washington left out rare-earth materials when it raised tariffs to 25% on basically all Chinese imports in recent times. Analysts said Beijing is less likely to resort to the aggressive measures it has used in the past, lest it incur the U.S. wrath. "China's attitudes and remarks are milder [this time] compared with when Beijing controlled shipments of rare earths to Japan in 2010," said Kotaro Shimizu, chief analyst at Mitsubishi UFJ Research and Consulting.


That year, the U.S. attempted to revive the mining of rare earths locally by introducing a bill, the Rare Earths Supply-Chain Technology and Resources Transformation, known as the RESTART Act. Even though the law failed to gain traction, Shimizu said, "Now we see again the rise of voices calling for rare-earth production in the U.S."


When Beijing controlled the exports to Japan, tensions between the countries had become more intense over the Senkaku Islands, which China claims and calls Diaoyu. During that time, Chinese public opinion was "all about how China can hurt Japan by leveraging rare earths," Shimizu said.


But the clampdown came with a price tag for China. Facing a sudden supply shortage and price spike, Japanese companies started to reduce rare-earth consumption and alternatively focused on recycling. According to the Japan Society of Newer Metals, the country's rare-earth demand fell to 13,197 tons in 2012 from 32,390 in 2007. "Beijing still remembers that they put their own industry in a really difficult situation by restricting rare-earth exports in 2010," said Yoshikazu Watanabe, president of Tsukushi Shigen Consul, a natural resources consulting company. "China's moves now are for show and to remind the U.S. that it could restrict exports."


Just after the failure of the RESTART Act, prices in the U.S. market slumped for years and mining company Molycorp filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2015. American rare-earth production finished solely from 2016 until last year, when the U.S. produced 15,000 metric tons, as stated in data from the U.S. Geological Survey.


The U.S. still is lacking capacities to separate rare earths. Ores obtained from Mountain Pass, the only U.S. mine under operation, are shipped to China, that has the most advanced separation technology. Beijing already imposed a 25% tariff on rare-earth ores from the U.S. that are sent to China for separation on June 1.


But initiatives are underway to fill the gap in the stateside supply chain. Australia's Lynas, the largest rare-earth producer outside China, announced in May that it had signed an agreement with U.S. rare-earth processor Blue Line for a partnership to develop separation facilities in the U.S. Shigeo Nakamura, president of Advanced Material Japan, said the U.S. has alternatives for separation in Vietnam, Myanmar and Estonia. "There will always be export pathways [available] to the U.S. through a third country," he said. So Beijing is treading cautiously as it works to strengthen its position.


China's economic planner, the National Development and Reform Commission, said just lately that rare-earth producers should abandon low-end production methods by increasing investment and research to enhance the competitiveness of their minerals.


Meanwhile, Beijing in May began restricting imports of rare earths from Myanmar to stop smuggling. Myanmar produces dysprosium and terbium - known as medium-heavy rare earths that can be found in very few places on the planet. Large volumes of ores flow illegally into China; reportedly, as much as 85% of China's rare-earth imports come from Myanmar.


When dealing with actual components like rare-earth magnets, which are shipped to the U.S. mainly from Japan, the effects of the tensions appear to be negligible so far. Shin-Etsu Chemical, which produces the magnets, said the trade war "hasn't had an impact on the production and shipments of rare-earth magnets." The Japanese company imports rare-earth alloys from its Chinese subsidiary in Fujian in southeastern China and makes the magnets in Japan.


Nakamura at Advanced Material Japan suggested China risks a boomerang effect. "The more Beijing tries to weaponize rare earths, the more development and investments the U.S. industry will attract," he said. "China will be the only one to lose out."





Source: NIKKEI ASIAN REVIEW

Tags:
china rare earths myanmar rare earth dysprosium myanmar dysprosium