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Friday 30th July 2021 03:28 AM

How One Manufacturer Solved its Skilled Labor Shortage by Starting a Training School


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“We knew we were facing a problem when we had tens of jobs open and not a single qualified candidate was applying,” said CEO of Precise Tool and Manufacturing, John S. Gizzi. “Customers were ordering parts, but we needed to wait to machine them simply because so many of our machines sat unmanned.”


It isn't an unusual issue; nearly 75 percent of manufacturers are encountering a moderate-to-severe in need of skilled workers and that number will only will continue to grow as baby boomers go into retirement. Companies across the nation are losing out on potential revenue because they can’t find sufficient employees to stay up with increasing demand.


So many manufacturers had resorted to traditional means of recruitment, including Precise Tool. After years of posting on job boards, billboards, and ads on the radio, they still were not receiving the applications they were looking for.


In 2012, Gizzi had an non-traditional idea: he determined to start a school that would train people to be the qualified CNC machinists and programmers Precise needed. That year, he opened the doors to the Precise CNC Machining Institute (PCMI) in Rochester, New York.


“Even though the contract manufacturing job market was rising, the number of people training for the industry was shrinking. We realized a big opportunity there: we could offer a real, life-changing career to people and solve our labor shortage.”


PCMI takes in approximately 8 students each program. Those who complete the program will be ready to start an occupation in manufacturing after graduation.


Students study the ins and outs of manufacturing by participating in a 14-week program that suits from 7:30am-4pm Monday through Friday. The syllabus consists of topics like safety and blueprint readings not forgetting tooling, speeds, and programming for a number of machines.


One essential benefit of the program is that the students get paid to learn. That’s correct, Precise Tool gives each student an hourly wage for the full-time, 14-week program.


“We invest much in our students because we need them to the extent that they need us,” said Gizzi. “We are now fundamentally paying them to train to be expert machinists who will hopefully work for us in the future.” Within the last seven years, Precise has hired a majority of its graduates from the program.


Gizzi added, “We use a lot of the students who graduate the program, and they allow us to run more machines on our floor than ever before. Without a skilled workforce, we would be not able to fulfill orders. PCMI was a huge undertaking for us, but the benefits have been magnificent.”


This article is originally posted on MANUFACTURING.NET


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Posted on : Friday 30th July 2021 03:28 AM

How One Manufacturer Solved its Skilled Labor Shortage by Starting a Training School


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
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“We knew we were facing a problem when we had tens of jobs open and not a single qualified candidate was applying,” said CEO of Precise Tool and Manufacturing, John S. Gizzi. “Customers were ordering parts, but we needed to wait to machine them simply because so many of our machines sat unmanned.”


It isn't an unusual issue; nearly 75 percent of manufacturers are encountering a moderate-to-severe in need of skilled workers and that number will only will continue to grow as baby boomers go into retirement. Companies across the nation are losing out on potential revenue because they can’t find sufficient employees to stay up with increasing demand.


So many manufacturers had resorted to traditional means of recruitment, including Precise Tool. After years of posting on job boards, billboards, and ads on the radio, they still were not receiving the applications they were looking for.


In 2012, Gizzi had an non-traditional idea: he determined to start a school that would train people to be the qualified CNC machinists and programmers Precise needed. That year, he opened the doors to the Precise CNC Machining Institute (PCMI) in Rochester, New York.


“Even though the contract manufacturing job market was rising, the number of people training for the industry was shrinking. We realized a big opportunity there: we could offer a real, life-changing career to people and solve our labor shortage.”


PCMI takes in approximately 8 students each program. Those who complete the program will be ready to start an occupation in manufacturing after graduation.


Students study the ins and outs of manufacturing by participating in a 14-week program that suits from 7:30am-4pm Monday through Friday. The syllabus consists of topics like safety and blueprint readings not forgetting tooling, speeds, and programming for a number of machines.


One essential benefit of the program is that the students get paid to learn. That’s correct, Precise Tool gives each student an hourly wage for the full-time, 14-week program.


“We invest much in our students because we need them to the extent that they need us,” said Gizzi. “We are now fundamentally paying them to train to be expert machinists who will hopefully work for us in the future.” Within the last seven years, Precise has hired a majority of its graduates from the program.


Gizzi added, “We use a lot of the students who graduate the program, and they allow us to run more machines on our floor than ever before. Without a skilled workforce, we would be not able to fulfill orders. PCMI was a huge undertaking for us, but the benefits have been magnificent.”


This article is originally posted on MANUFACTURING.NET

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old recruitment methods new recruitment methods skilled workers labor training school cnc machines