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Author: Tronserve admin

Saturday 24th July 2021 10:08 PM

Robot Fish Powered by Synthetic Blood Just Keeps Swimming


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Living things are stupendously complex, and when we make robots (even bio-inspired robots), we mostly just try and do the best we can to match the functionality of animals, rather than the details of their structure. One exception to this is hydraulic robots, which work on the same concept as spiders do, by pumping pressurized fluid around to move limbs. This is more of a side effect than actual bio-inspiration, though, as spiders still beat robots in that they use their blood as both a hydraulic fluid and to do everything else that blood does, like transporting nutrients and oxygen where it’s needed.

 

In a paper printed in Nature this week, researchers from Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania are showing a robotic fish that uses synthetic blood pumped through an artificial circulatory system to offer both hydraulic force for muscles and a marketed source of electrical power. The system they came up with "combines the functions of hydraulic force transmission, actuation and energy storage into a single integrated design that geometrically grows the vitality density of the robot to enable activity for long durations," which sounds bloody amazing, doesn’t it?

 

Conventional batteries may be more energy dense, but that Tesla also has to lug around motors and stuff if it wants to go anywhere. By using its blood to drive hydraulic actuators as well, this fish is far more excellent. Inside the fish are two separate pumps, each one able to pump blood from a reservoir of sorts into (or out of) an actuator. Pumping blood from the dorsal spines into the pectoral fins pushes the fins outward from the body, and pumping blood from one side of the tail to the other and back again results in a swimming motion.

 

In total, the fish contains about 0.2 liter of blood, distributed throughout an artificial vascular system that was designed on a pretty basic level to resemble the structure of a real heart. The rest of the fish is made of structural elements that are somewhat like muscle and cartilage. It’s probably best to try not to draw too many parallels between this robot and an actual fish, though, and we may have already gone just slightly overboard on the whole “blood” thing. But the point is that combining actuation, force transmission, and energy storage has significant advantages for this particular robot. The researchers say that plenty of optimization is possible as well, which would lead to benefits in both performance and efficiency.



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com


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This is the old design: Please remove this section after work on the functionalities for new design

Posted on : Saturday 24th July 2021 10:08 PM

Robot Fish Powered by Synthetic Blood Just Keeps Swimming


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
image cap

Living things are stupendously complex, and when we make robots (even bio-inspired robots), we mostly just try and do the best we can to match the functionality of animals, rather than the details of their structure. One exception to this is hydraulic robots, which work on the same concept as spiders do, by pumping pressurized fluid around to move limbs. This is more of a side effect than actual bio-inspiration, though, as spiders still beat robots in that they use their blood as both a hydraulic fluid and to do everything else that blood does, like transporting nutrients and oxygen where it’s needed.

 

In a paper printed in Nature this week, researchers from Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania are showing a robotic fish that uses synthetic blood pumped through an artificial circulatory system to offer both hydraulic force for muscles and a marketed source of electrical power. The system they came up with "combines the functions of hydraulic force transmission, actuation and energy storage into a single integrated design that geometrically grows the vitality density of the robot to enable activity for long durations," which sounds bloody amazing, doesn’t it?

 

Conventional batteries may be more energy dense, but that Tesla also has to lug around motors and stuff if it wants to go anywhere. By using its blood to drive hydraulic actuators as well, this fish is far more excellent. Inside the fish are two separate pumps, each one able to pump blood from a reservoir of sorts into (or out of) an actuator. Pumping blood from the dorsal spines into the pectoral fins pushes the fins outward from the body, and pumping blood from one side of the tail to the other and back again results in a swimming motion.

 

In total, the fish contains about 0.2 liter of blood, distributed throughout an artificial vascular system that was designed on a pretty basic level to resemble the structure of a real heart. The rest of the fish is made of structural elements that are somewhat like muscle and cartilage. It’s probably best to try not to draw too many parallels between this robot and an actual fish, though, and we may have already gone just slightly overboard on the whole “blood” thing. But the point is that combining actuation, force transmission, and energy storage has significant advantages for this particular robot. The researchers say that plenty of optimization is possible as well, which would lead to benefits in both performance and efficiency.



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com

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robotic fish university of pennsylvania hydraulic force