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Author: Tronserve admin

Friday 30th July 2021 12:13 AM

This Drone Explode Into Maple Seed Microdrones in Midair


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As useful as old-fashioned fixed-wing and quadrotor drones have grow to be, they still tend to be relatively complex, expensive machines that you really desire to be able to use more than once. When a one-way trip is all that you have in mind, you want something simple, reliable, and cheap, and we’ve seen a bunch of many designs for drone gliders that more or less fulfill those criteria.

 

For an even simpler gliding design, you want to minimize both airframe mass and control surfaces, and the maple tree supplies some inspiration in the form of samara, those unique seed pods that whirl to the ground in the fall. Samara are really just an unbalanced wing that spins, and while the natural ones don’t steer, adding an actuated flap to the robotic version and moving it at just the right time results in enough controllability to aim for a specific point on the ground.

 

Roboticists at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have been trying with samara-inspired drones, and in a new paper in IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters they explore what happens if you connect five of the drones together and then split them in mid air.

 

Generally, a samara design acts as a decelerator for an aerial payload. You can think of it like a parachute: It makes sure that no matter what you toss out of an airplane gets to the ground intact rather than just smashing itself to bits on impact. Steering is conceivable, but you don’t get a lot of stability or precision control. The RA-L paper explains one solution to this, which is to collaboratively use five drones at once in a configuration that looks a bit like a helicopter rotor.

And once the multi-drone is right where you want it, the five individual samara drones can split off all at once, heading out on their own missions. It's quite a sight.

 

The samara autorotating wing drones themselves could perhaps carry small payloads like sensors or emergency medical supplies, with these small-scale variations able to handle an extra 30 grams of payload. While they might not have as much capacity as a traditional fixed-wing glider, they have the gain of being able to descent vertically, and can perform better than a parachute due to their capability to steer. The researchers plan on improving the design of their little drones, with the goal of boosting the rotation speed and improving the control performance of both the individual drones and the multi-wing collaborative version.



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com


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Posted on : Friday 30th July 2021 12:13 AM

This Drone Explode Into Maple Seed Microdrones in Midair


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
image cap

As useful as old-fashioned fixed-wing and quadrotor drones have grow to be, they still tend to be relatively complex, expensive machines that you really desire to be able to use more than once. When a one-way trip is all that you have in mind, you want something simple, reliable, and cheap, and we’ve seen a bunch of many designs for drone gliders that more or less fulfill those criteria.

 

For an even simpler gliding design, you want to minimize both airframe mass and control surfaces, and the maple tree supplies some inspiration in the form of samara, those unique seed pods that whirl to the ground in the fall. Samara are really just an unbalanced wing that spins, and while the natural ones don’t steer, adding an actuated flap to the robotic version and moving it at just the right time results in enough controllability to aim for a specific point on the ground.

 

Roboticists at the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have been trying with samara-inspired drones, and in a new paper in IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters they explore what happens if you connect five of the drones together and then split them in mid air.

 

Generally, a samara design acts as a decelerator for an aerial payload. You can think of it like a parachute: It makes sure that no matter what you toss out of an airplane gets to the ground intact rather than just smashing itself to bits on impact. Steering is conceivable, but you don’t get a lot of stability or precision control. The RA-L paper explains one solution to this, which is to collaboratively use five drones at once in a configuration that looks a bit like a helicopter rotor.

And once the multi-drone is right where you want it, the five individual samara drones can split off all at once, heading out on their own missions. It's quite a sight.

 

The samara autorotating wing drones themselves could perhaps carry small payloads like sensors or emergency medical supplies, with these small-scale variations able to handle an extra 30 grams of payload. While they might not have as much capacity as a traditional fixed-wing glider, they have the gain of being able to descent vertically, and can perform better than a parachute due to their capability to steer. The researchers plan on improving the design of their little drones, with the goal of boosting the rotation speed and improving the control performance of both the individual drones and the multi-wing collaborative version.



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com

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microdrones explode in midair quadrotor