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Author: Content Team Blog Posting

Sunday 25th July 2021 11:01 PM

How to Design Landing Pages to Suit Your Business Goals


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How to design landing pages to suit your business goals


Landing pages are webpages that appear in response to a marketing or advertising campaign. They are usually the first page that viewers see before they visit one’s website. Once on said landing page, users are then encouraged to do an action, such as clicking to learn more, joining an email list, or buying products. Many entrepreneurs with websites often create a landing page as their home page, making it both the flagship of their website, and an easily marketable website page.


However, making a landing page isn’t as easy as it seems. Landing page designs should be clear and concise, but it’s possible for amateur designers to mistake “more” as “better”.


Imagine one’s website selling a product. On their landing page, they advertise said product. Then, the website invites users to visit the blog page. Then, to check out five different social media channels. Then, to read about the company’s brand. With every differing Call To Action, the chances of the user buying the product has grown smaller and smaller.
 


Before landing pages are designed, there are a few key elements to take note of:


Relevance


A landing page must be relevant and specific to one’s goals. Pages that fail to show – or incorrectly show – promises in marketing and advertisements can lead to discouraged and frustrated customers. For an all-too-common example, a shop advertises a 10% discount, but their landing page states a 5% discount. This disparity in relevance can lead to potential customers closing the tab instead!


To The Point


A page full of words will lose a viewer’s interest. Don’t stuff a landing page full of words. Concise landing pages allow for viewers to quickly know what they hope to gain from your brand, and if they stuck around long enough to be impressed, they’re more likely to be potential customers!

Long paragraphs and explanatory videos should be used for customers that are already keen on learning more about your brand.


Impact


Above all else, despite being creative and clear, a landing page must not lose its impact. Impactful landing pages enhance information rather than laying it out for viewers to sift through, with a clear Call To Action and instructions to how a potential customer should follow it. This results in high conversion rates and potential leads!


With these in mind, let’s take a look at some types of landing pages that will help you, a fellow website owner, achieve your business goals.


I want customers to sign up for my memberships/ email/ phone list!


This is a common landing page for brands providing services, such as catering or exercise centres. Organic email lists and phone numbers can be regularly checked up on, which can be beneficial to one’s business. Because of how this page is used to gather quick details and information (such as emails, phone numbers, and interest in memberships), these pages are often known as squeeze pages.


For this type of landing page, it is better to keep the landing page simple, and detail the key benefits of being a member. Eliminate all distractions to create an account; most viewers that make it to this type of landing page already have your brand’s pros and cons in their head sufficiently weighed, and they want to join as soon as possible.


In the image below, note the can’t-miss-it account creation form. The patterned background contrasts nicely with the form field so it’s the only thing that stands out.


 
I want customers to know more about me!


These are a tricky landing page to create. Long landing pages painted with words can steer viewers clear from your site, but sometimes your services are complicated. How can you make a landing page feel short?


In the example image below, there is a prominent Call To Action (CTA), sticking out from the professional-looking background. The arrow encourages scrolling, and customers that are keen to learn more can easily digest the short paragraphs, rich in content but straight to the point. Bold words and fanciful colours draw attention to titles and content that matters, and the Call To Action at the bottom is strategic, bringing customers away to where the first CTA button led.


 
I want to capture leads and convert them to me!


These sorts of landing pages are informally known as lead capture pages, with how these pages are intended to capture more in-depth information about potential viewers. Names, company brands, job titles, and industries are usually not given without a certain degree of trust between website and viewer. Because of this, they are different from a typical squeeze page, that looks like this:


 
Compared to this:
 


Lead capture pages generally possess more information, and are usually used for following up when a viewer has shown real interest in your products or services (like a viewer who had already installed two free e-books off your site.) In this scenario, lead capture pages are useful to ask for more information and easily direct these viewers to better satisfy their needs.


I want viewers to remember my site!


Sometimes, there are pages that can be linked with seasonal advertisements or social media content. These are informally known as splash pages, which act as intermediary pages to share announcements, like “We’re going to have a flash sale on April 1st!”. Often found with big, bold words surrounding a CTA, and minimal information except those necessary to the specific event, splash pages stick out in a viewer’s head.


However, splash pages should not be used as a main landing page, as they provide too little information to be beneficial for long-term consumers. They can be used to gather information on potential leads during seasonal holidays, such as the example image, where summer fashion and discounts come hand in hand to provide the company with email addresses of prospective consumers.


 
Another type of splash page would be a “coming soon” page, that gets potential viewers excited about upcoming events and announcements. Esports teams and event space managements use this splash page to great effect, as the viewers that often land on these landing pages are already keen on the services they provide.


 
Now that you’ve got a few landing pages in your website building arsenal, there are a few questions to consider before launching a landing page:

  • “What are my audience’s goals when they land on my landing page?”
  • “What are my competitor’s goals and how are they achieving them with their landing page?”
  • “What are my end goals with my landing page?”


Satisfying all three of these goals would be optimal for one’s landing page. Here’s an example:


Audience goal: Understand more about your site.
Your end goal: Create more conversions and boost sales.


In this case, a lead capture page would suit the purpose well. One could then survey their competitors’ lead capture pages, take notes on how they structure their pages (Are they putting information concisely? Are they keeping information details easy to input and securely stored?) and implement them into your own landing page.


Now that you know what landing pages are and how to use them, why not try creating one? Build your own page with Tronserve today.










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This is the old design: Please remove this section after work on the functionalities for new design

Posted on : Sunday 25th July 2021 11:01 PM

How to Design Landing Pages to Suit Your Business Goals


none
Posted by  Content Team Blog Posting
image cap

How to design landing pages to suit your business goals


Landing pages are webpages that appear in response to a marketing or advertising campaign. They are usually the first page that viewers see before they visit one’s website. Once on said landing page, users are then encouraged to do an action, such as clicking to learn more, joining an email list, or buying products. Many entrepreneurs with websites often create a landing page as their home page, making it both the flagship of their website, and an easily marketable website page.


However, making a landing page isn’t as easy as it seems. Landing page designs should be clear and concise, but it’s possible for amateur designers to mistake “more” as “better”.


Imagine one’s website selling a product. On their landing page, they advertise said product. Then, the website invites users to visit the blog page. Then, to check out five different social media channels. Then, to read about the company’s brand. With every differing Call To Action, the chances of the user buying the product has grown smaller and smaller.
 


Before landing pages are designed, there are a few key elements to take note of:


Relevance


A landing page must be relevant and specific to one’s goals. Pages that fail to show – or incorrectly show – promises in marketing and advertisements can lead to discouraged and frustrated customers. For an all-too-common example, a shop advertises a 10% discount, but their landing page states a 5% discount. This disparity in relevance can lead to potential customers closing the tab instead!


To The Point


A page full of words will lose a viewer’s interest. Don’t stuff a landing page full of words. Concise landing pages allow for viewers to quickly know what they hope to gain from your brand, and if they stuck around long enough to be impressed, they’re more likely to be potential customers!

Long paragraphs and explanatory videos should be used for customers that are already keen on learning more about your brand.


Impact


Above all else, despite being creative and clear, a landing page must not lose its impact. Impactful landing pages enhance information rather than laying it out for viewers to sift through, with a clear Call To Action and instructions to how a potential customer should follow it. This results in high conversion rates and potential leads!


With these in mind, let’s take a look at some types of landing pages that will help you, a fellow website owner, achieve your business goals.


I want customers to sign up for my memberships/ email/ phone list!


This is a common landing page for brands providing services, such as catering or exercise centres. Organic email lists and phone numbers can be regularly checked up on, which can be beneficial to one’s business. Because of how this page is used to gather quick details and information (such as emails, phone numbers, and interest in memberships), these pages are often known as squeeze pages.


For this type of landing page, it is better to keep the landing page simple, and detail the key benefits of being a member. Eliminate all distractions to create an account; most viewers that make it to this type of landing page already have your brand’s pros and cons in their head sufficiently weighed, and they want to join as soon as possible.


In the image below, note the can’t-miss-it account creation form. The patterned background contrasts nicely with the form field so it’s the only thing that stands out.


 
I want customers to know more about me!


These are a tricky landing page to create. Long landing pages painted with words can steer viewers clear from your site, but sometimes your services are complicated. How can you make a landing page feel short?


In the example image below, there is a prominent Call To Action (CTA), sticking out from the professional-looking background. The arrow encourages scrolling, and customers that are keen to learn more can easily digest the short paragraphs, rich in content but straight to the point. Bold words and fanciful colours draw attention to titles and content that matters, and the Call To Action at the bottom is strategic, bringing customers away to where the first CTA button led.


 
I want to capture leads and convert them to me!


These sorts of landing pages are informally known as lead capture pages, with how these pages are intended to capture more in-depth information about potential viewers. Names, company brands, job titles, and industries are usually not given without a certain degree of trust between website and viewer. Because of this, they are different from a typical squeeze page, that looks like this:


 
Compared to this:
 


Lead capture pages generally possess more information, and are usually used for following up when a viewer has shown real interest in your products or services (like a viewer who had already installed two free e-books off your site.) In this scenario, lead capture pages are useful to ask for more information and easily direct these viewers to better satisfy their needs.


I want viewers to remember my site!


Sometimes, there are pages that can be linked with seasonal advertisements or social media content. These are informally known as splash pages, which act as intermediary pages to share announcements, like “We’re going to have a flash sale on April 1st!”. Often found with big, bold words surrounding a CTA, and minimal information except those necessary to the specific event, splash pages stick out in a viewer’s head.


However, splash pages should not be used as a main landing page, as they provide too little information to be beneficial for long-term consumers. They can be used to gather information on potential leads during seasonal holidays, such as the example image, where summer fashion and discounts come hand in hand to provide the company with email addresses of prospective consumers.


 
Another type of splash page would be a “coming soon” page, that gets potential viewers excited about upcoming events and announcements. Esports teams and event space managements use this splash page to great effect, as the viewers that often land on these landing pages are already keen on the services they provide.


 
Now that you’ve got a few landing pages in your website building arsenal, there are a few questions to consider before launching a landing page:

  • “What are my audience’s goals when they land on my landing page?”
  • “What are my competitor’s goals and how are they achieving them with their landing page?”
  • “What are my end goals with my landing page?”


Satisfying all three of these goals would be optimal for one’s landing page. Here’s an example:


Audience goal: Understand more about your site.
Your end goal: Create more conversions and boost sales.


In this case, a lead capture page would suit the purpose well. One could then survey their competitors’ lead capture pages, take notes on how they structure their pages (Are they putting information concisely? Are they keeping information details easy to input and securely stored?) and implement them into your own landing page.


Now that you know what landing pages are and how to use them, why not try creating one? Build your own page with Tronserve today.









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landing page website entrepreneur business website design site design