Your browser does not support JavaScript!

Author: Tronserve admin

Wednesday 28th July 2021 05:42 AM

IoT Conference Traces Changing Industry


image cap
147 Views

At IoT World, held in Santa Clara, California, from May 13-16, 2019, manufacturers joined up with companies from a huge number of industries to network and explore how the Internet of Things is transforming the way people do business. Zach Butler, portfolio director for IoT World at Informa Tech, sat down with Manufacturing.net to share an inside look at the show.


Established in 2014 by Informa, IoT World continues to grow significantly along with its subject matter. In 2019 about 12,500 people attended, up from 700 people the first year. Butler revealed that while the show developed by leaps and bounds from 2014 to 2016, it has seen continued but more gradual growth after the initial spike in interest. This matches the rate of adoption among companies; the show was primed to catch the increasing adoption of IoT. Now, nine different tracks that span IoT allow companies that use multiple applications to network and learn based on particular subjects.


This year, he said the show floor is witnessing more physical/industrial applications and vehicles. From automotive, IoT is trickling into other sectors. 


“Automotive is most likely the pinnacle of application because automotive covers everything,” Butler said. “Auto manufacturing is one of the most precision industries out there, and then car makers need to make vehicles that can save lives. So they use lots of different technology in there.”


Butler specified that he perceives of IoT as a movement, not a technology. Of course, the term covers an array of devices and systems. Some see artificial intelligence as a component of IoT, while Butler speaks of it as an analytic tool sitting on top of some of the IoT capabilities in wide use now.


As for the path to the future, Butler said that he’s seeing more companies transfer to edge computing and on-premise compute. Many companies are choosing to use edge computing rather than going to cloud computing.


“We’re still in the cloud revolution,” Butler said. “Companies are going to swap and transform and miss out on capturing potential new areas of business.” In particular, he said, these areas include data services—information as a service. “[Manufacturers can] own more of the life cycle of the customer with maintenance and training.”


For companies that are already involved in As-A-Service support but want to move further into analysis and other applications of IoT, Butler said, look at your goal first, not what technology might be presented to you. “Start with the outcome. Are you looking to improve the quality of your product? Or are you looking to find new business models? Once companies know that, they have to know how to change … and IoT provides data to create those outcomes.”


This article is originally posted on MANUFACTURING.NET


Share this post:


This is the old design: Please remove this section after work on the functionalities for new design

Posted on : Wednesday 28th July 2021 05:42 AM

IoT Conference Traces Changing Industry


none
Posted by  Tronserve admin
image cap

At IoT World, held in Santa Clara, California, from May 13-16, 2019, manufacturers joined up with companies from a huge number of industries to network and explore how the Internet of Things is transforming the way people do business. Zach Butler, portfolio director for IoT World at Informa Tech, sat down with Manufacturing.net to share an inside look at the show.


Established in 2014 by Informa, IoT World continues to grow significantly along with its subject matter. In 2019 about 12,500 people attended, up from 700 people the first year. Butler revealed that while the show developed by leaps and bounds from 2014 to 2016, it has seen continued but more gradual growth after the initial spike in interest. This matches the rate of adoption among companies; the show was primed to catch the increasing adoption of IoT. Now, nine different tracks that span IoT allow companies that use multiple applications to network and learn based on particular subjects.


This year, he said the show floor is witnessing more physical/industrial applications and vehicles. From automotive, IoT is trickling into other sectors. 


“Automotive is most likely the pinnacle of application because automotive covers everything,” Butler said. “Auto manufacturing is one of the most precision industries out there, and then car makers need to make vehicles that can save lives. So they use lots of different technology in there.”


Butler specified that he perceives of IoT as a movement, not a technology. Of course, the term covers an array of devices and systems. Some see artificial intelligence as a component of IoT, while Butler speaks of it as an analytic tool sitting on top of some of the IoT capabilities in wide use now.


As for the path to the future, Butler said that he’s seeing more companies transfer to edge computing and on-premise compute. Many companies are choosing to use edge computing rather than going to cloud computing.


“We’re still in the cloud revolution,” Butler said. “Companies are going to swap and transform and miss out on capturing potential new areas of business.” In particular, he said, these areas include data services—information as a service. “[Manufacturers can] own more of the life cycle of the customer with maintenance and training.”


For companies that are already involved in As-A-Service support but want to move further into analysis and other applications of IoT, Butler said, look at your goal first, not what technology might be presented to you. “Start with the outcome. Are you looking to improve the quality of your product? Or are you looking to find new business models? Once companies know that, they have to know how to change … and IoT provides data to create those outcomes.”


This article is originally posted on MANUFACTURING.NET

Tags:
built for iot impact of industrial iot iot world