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Wednesday 4th August 2021 01:36 PM

Is Workplace Discrimination Just a Cliché in the Manufacturing Industry


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We rarely take into consideration our gender when evaluating what we want to do with our lives. Gender equality has come a long way over the past several decades. Fields that were once controlled by men are now seeing more and more women. A study conducted by CareerBuilder, however, indicated that gender still influences what people can expect to get out of their careers.

 

Take men for example. They expect better job levels throughout their career when compared to women. Indeed, their expectations to fill both CEO and vice president roles is twice that of what women expect. Only 10 percent of men think to remain in entry-level positions while 22 percent of women have the same expectation. Also notable is that 54 percent of men view their jobs as a career while only 47 percent of women have the same view. 42 percent of men are satisfied with their career advancement opportunities, but only 36 percent of women are.

 

What about you? Do you believe women's pay is comparable to men's?

 

The CareerBuilder study reveals 34 percent of women believe their pay isn't comparable to what men make who hold the same position and have the same experience. On the other side of the fence, though, 82 percent of men believe the wages is equal. But all these differences don't lead to job dissatisfaction among many women. Even though women have differing views around career expectations and equal pay, the rate at which men (64 percent) and women (63 percent) are satisfied with their careers is about the same.

 

Is Discrimination a Cliché in the Manufacturing Industry?

 

The labor force has an almost equal composition of men (53 percent) and women (47 percent). However, among the manufacturing manpower, only 27 percent of the industry consists of women. Why is this? Is work environment discrimination just a cliché in the manufacturing industry, or is it a real problem?

 

Gendered career paths are quite typical in spite of society's recognizance of them. Take for example the manufacturing industry. Men are expected to occupy many of the higher-up jobs, including engineering and management positions. Women, however, are usually placed in quality control and accounting roles alongside other human resource positions.

 

Why does this happen? Is it simply because men are more typically associated with aggressiveness and independence, both of which are two attributes that must be mastered to effectively fill leadership roles? Perhaps women are pointed toward safety control roles because of their "feminine" qualities of nurturing and caring.

 

Irregardless of whether these gendered career paths are intentional, it is evident that opportunities for career development and advancement are more usual for men than for women. It's also remarkable that many women fail to seek leadership roles because of the disadvantage they endure when networking. Since more leadership roles are filled by men, this puts women in a special position -- they must lean on males as mentors to guide them, but for some women, they would much rather follow in the footsteps of a female mentor rather than a male.

 

Workplace Patterns That Indicate Unconscious Gender Bias

 

In case you notice any of these behaviours occurring in your workplace, there's a good possibility that involuntary — or perhaps conscious — gender bias is creating the company toward a more male-dominated brand.

 

•             Women have to exhibit more expertise than men to be considered as equally competent as their male counterparts. This leads many women having to prove themselves again and again.

•             The women in your workplace walk a fine line of trying not to be too feminine or masculine.

•             Your work environment places a label on women, believing they become much less committed to their work after having children or starting a family.

•             There's a tug-of-war conflict (this is frequently seen in the manufacturing industry) where women are constantly battling men to fill a limited number of leadership roles.

 

How to Avoid Gender Bias in the Workplace

 

Ernesto Reuben, a professor at the Columbia Business School, says, “Studies that seek to answer why there are more men than women in STEM fields typically focus on women’s interests and choices. This may be important, but our experiments show that another culprit of this phenomenon is that hiring managers possess an extraordinary level of gender bias when making decisions and filling positions, often times choosing the less qualified male over a superiorly qualified female.” To prevent gender bias in your manufacturing plant, ensure to follow the tips listed below.

 

Use Valuable Data

 

Carry out surveys and audits in the workplace to assess gender bias. Don't use limited findings to influence your procedure of eliminating gender bias. Take for example you conduct a survey that shows there is no evidence of sexual assault in your plant. This finding is highly unlikely, so, therefore, you should start asking yourself why no one is coming forward. Always put both men and women as moderators of the audits. This makes sure women feel comfortable coming forward with their true ideas and concerns.

 

Collaborate

 

You're not the only manufacturing plant that struggles with gender bias, and you're not the only one seeking to make a change. Due to this, it's always helpful to join forces with other manufacturing companies that have successfully corrected gender bias. You can apply their knowledge and strategies to handle gender bias in your own plant.

 

Draw a Straight Line

 

Create bathing rooms and locker rooms separately for men and women, each of which should be the exact same size. Also, while we're on the topic of locker rooms, ensure to enforce a policy that discourages "locker room" talk. Locker room talk does occur among both women and men, and it can make major drama in the workplace. Locker room talk takes place when males talk wrongly about women and vice versa.

 

If you sense you are a victim of workplace discrimination, it's imperative to consult with your supervisor. You are entitled to equal treatment in the workplace despite of your gender.

 

This article is originally posted on manufacturing.net


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Posted on : Wednesday 4th August 2021 01:36 PM

Is Workplace Discrimination Just a Cliché in the Manufacturing Industry


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
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We rarely take into consideration our gender when evaluating what we want to do with our lives. Gender equality has come a long way over the past several decades. Fields that were once controlled by men are now seeing more and more women. A study conducted by CareerBuilder, however, indicated that gender still influences what people can expect to get out of their careers.

 

Take men for example. They expect better job levels throughout their career when compared to women. Indeed, their expectations to fill both CEO and vice president roles is twice that of what women expect. Only 10 percent of men think to remain in entry-level positions while 22 percent of women have the same expectation. Also notable is that 54 percent of men view their jobs as a career while only 47 percent of women have the same view. 42 percent of men are satisfied with their career advancement opportunities, but only 36 percent of women are.

 

What about you? Do you believe women's pay is comparable to men's?

 

The CareerBuilder study reveals 34 percent of women believe their pay isn't comparable to what men make who hold the same position and have the same experience. On the other side of the fence, though, 82 percent of men believe the wages is equal. But all these differences don't lead to job dissatisfaction among many women. Even though women have differing views around career expectations and equal pay, the rate at which men (64 percent) and women (63 percent) are satisfied with their careers is about the same.

 

Is Discrimination a Cliché in the Manufacturing Industry?

 

The labor force has an almost equal composition of men (53 percent) and women (47 percent). However, among the manufacturing manpower, only 27 percent of the industry consists of women. Why is this? Is work environment discrimination just a cliché in the manufacturing industry, or is it a real problem?

 

Gendered career paths are quite typical in spite of society's recognizance of them. Take for example the manufacturing industry. Men are expected to occupy many of the higher-up jobs, including engineering and management positions. Women, however, are usually placed in quality control and accounting roles alongside other human resource positions.

 

Why does this happen? Is it simply because men are more typically associated with aggressiveness and independence, both of which are two attributes that must be mastered to effectively fill leadership roles? Perhaps women are pointed toward safety control roles because of their "feminine" qualities of nurturing and caring.

 

Irregardless of whether these gendered career paths are intentional, it is evident that opportunities for career development and advancement are more usual for men than for women. It's also remarkable that many women fail to seek leadership roles because of the disadvantage they endure when networking. Since more leadership roles are filled by men, this puts women in a special position -- they must lean on males as mentors to guide them, but for some women, they would much rather follow in the footsteps of a female mentor rather than a male.

 

Workplace Patterns That Indicate Unconscious Gender Bias

 

In case you notice any of these behaviours occurring in your workplace, there's a good possibility that involuntary — or perhaps conscious — gender bias is creating the company toward a more male-dominated brand.

 

•             Women have to exhibit more expertise than men to be considered as equally competent as their male counterparts. This leads many women having to prove themselves again and again.

•             The women in your workplace walk a fine line of trying not to be too feminine or masculine.

•             Your work environment places a label on women, believing they become much less committed to their work after having children or starting a family.

•             There's a tug-of-war conflict (this is frequently seen in the manufacturing industry) where women are constantly battling men to fill a limited number of leadership roles.

 

How to Avoid Gender Bias in the Workplace

 

Ernesto Reuben, a professor at the Columbia Business School, says, “Studies that seek to answer why there are more men than women in STEM fields typically focus on women’s interests and choices. This may be important, but our experiments show that another culprit of this phenomenon is that hiring managers possess an extraordinary level of gender bias when making decisions and filling positions, often times choosing the less qualified male over a superiorly qualified female.” To prevent gender bias in your manufacturing plant, ensure to follow the tips listed below.

 

Use Valuable Data

 

Carry out surveys and audits in the workplace to assess gender bias. Don't use limited findings to influence your procedure of eliminating gender bias. Take for example you conduct a survey that shows there is no evidence of sexual assault in your plant. This finding is highly unlikely, so, therefore, you should start asking yourself why no one is coming forward. Always put both men and women as moderators of the audits. This makes sure women feel comfortable coming forward with their true ideas and concerns.

 

Collaborate

 

You're not the only manufacturing plant that struggles with gender bias, and you're not the only one seeking to make a change. Due to this, it's always helpful to join forces with other manufacturing companies that have successfully corrected gender bias. You can apply their knowledge and strategies to handle gender bias in your own plant.

 

Draw a Straight Line

 

Create bathing rooms and locker rooms separately for men and women, each of which should be the exact same size. Also, while we're on the topic of locker rooms, ensure to enforce a policy that discourages "locker room" talk. Locker room talk does occur among both women and men, and it can make major drama in the workplace. Locker room talk takes place when males talk wrongly about women and vice versa.

 

If you sense you are a victim of workplace discrimination, it's imperative to consult with your supervisor. You are entitled to equal treatment in the workplace despite of your gender.

 

This article is originally posted on manufacturing.net

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