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Sunday 19th September 2021 11:08 PM

Robot Squid and Robot Scallop Showcase Bio-inspired Underwater Propulsion


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Most underwater robots use one of two ways of acquiring around. Way one is with propellers, and way two is with fins. But animals have displayed us that there are numerous more kinds of underwater locomotion, possibly offering unique benefits to robots. We’ll take a look at two papers from ICRA this year that showed bioinspired underwater robots transferring in innovative new ways: A jet-powered squid robot that can leap out of the water, plus a robotic scallop that moves just like the real thing.

 

This “squid-like aquatic-aerial vehicle” from Beihang University in China is modeled after flying squids. Real squids, in addition to being delicious, propel themselves using water jets, and these jets are mighty enough that some squids can not only jump out of the water, but really attain controlled flight for a brief period by enduring to jet while in the air. The flight phase is expanded through the use of fins as arms and wings to create a little bit of lift. Real squids use this multimodal propulsion to escape predators, and it’s also much faster—a squid can double its normal swimming speed while in the air, flying at up to 50 body lengths per second.

 

The squid robot is driven chiefly by compressed air, which it stores in a cylinder in its nose (do squids have noses?). The fins and arms are controlled by pneumatic actuators. When the robot wants to move through the water, it opens a value to unleash a modest amount of compressed air; releasing the air all at once generates enough thrust to fire the robot squid completely out of the water.

 

The jumping that you see at the end of the video is preliminary work; we’re told that the robot squid can travel between 10 and 20 meters by jumping, whereas using its jet underwater will take it just 10 meters. At the moment, the squid can only fire its jet once, but the researchers plan to change the compressed air with something a bit denser, like liquid CO2, which will let for extended operation and multiple jumps. There’s also plenty of work to do with using the fins for dynamic control, which the researchers say will “reveal the superiority of the natural flying squid movement.”



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com


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Posted on : Sunday 19th September 2021 11:08 PM

Robot Squid and Robot Scallop Showcase Bio-inspired Underwater Propulsion


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Posted by  Tronserve admin
image cap

Most underwater robots use one of two ways of acquiring around. Way one is with propellers, and way two is with fins. But animals have displayed us that there are numerous more kinds of underwater locomotion, possibly offering unique benefits to robots. We’ll take a look at two papers from ICRA this year that showed bioinspired underwater robots transferring in innovative new ways: A jet-powered squid robot that can leap out of the water, plus a robotic scallop that moves just like the real thing.

 

This “squid-like aquatic-aerial vehicle” from Beihang University in China is modeled after flying squids. Real squids, in addition to being delicious, propel themselves using water jets, and these jets are mighty enough that some squids can not only jump out of the water, but really attain controlled flight for a brief period by enduring to jet while in the air. The flight phase is expanded through the use of fins as arms and wings to create a little bit of lift. Real squids use this multimodal propulsion to escape predators, and it’s also much faster—a squid can double its normal swimming speed while in the air, flying at up to 50 body lengths per second.

 

The squid robot is driven chiefly by compressed air, which it stores in a cylinder in its nose (do squids have noses?). The fins and arms are controlled by pneumatic actuators. When the robot wants to move through the water, it opens a value to unleash a modest amount of compressed air; releasing the air all at once generates enough thrust to fire the robot squid completely out of the water.

 

The jumping that you see at the end of the video is preliminary work; we’re told that the robot squid can travel between 10 and 20 meters by jumping, whereas using its jet underwater will take it just 10 meters. At the moment, the squid can only fire its jet once, but the researchers plan to change the compressed air with something a bit denser, like liquid CO2, which will let for extended operation and multiple jumps. There’s also plenty of work to do with using the fins for dynamic control, which the researchers say will “reveal the superiority of the natural flying squid movement.”



This article is originally posted on IEEESPECTRUM.com

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robot squid robot scallop showcase bio inspired